Unexpected Culture Shock in Albania: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Unexpected Culture Shock in Albania: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

There isn’t a word that exists to accurately describe Albania. Certain words that come to mind include chaotic, unorganized, unique, beautiful, and crazy. Albania is “different”. In fact, it’s definitely the most different European country I have ever visited. I can admit fully that Albania gave me the biggest culture shock I’d ever experienced before in Europe. That is something I certainly was not expecting. Albania is the Egypt of Europe, there I said it.

Why I chose to visit Albania?

My best friend recently moved to Durres, Albania. I must admit, I had to look on a map to figure out where exactly Albania was. Albania is located in Southeast Europe and lies along the Adriatic and Ionian Seas. When I realized it shared the same seas with Croatia, Italy, and Greece, my 3 favourite countries, I was more than eager to visit this lesser known Balkan country.

Hot to get to Albania? 

After extensive research, I found that the easiest way to get to the Albanian Riviera was to fly into Corfu, Greece and then take a one hour ferry to Sarande. The cost of the ferry ticket was 23.80€ during peak season and the company I used was Ionian Cruises. The other option is to fly into Tirana, and then take a bus down to Sarande, taking anywhere from 5-8 hours.

My “go-to” booking site for flights is Skyscanner…I swear by them! You can start searching below ♥

(Full disclosure: This little search box contains an affiliate link, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using this link, at no extra cost to you. Yay!).


Ksamil Beach, Albanian Riviera

Ksamil Beach, Albanian Riviera


The Good

The Albanian Riviera

The Albanian Riviera is situated in the perfect location, where the Ionian and Adriatic Seas meet, explaining why the water is so gorgeous and colorful. After seeing a handful of beautiful Google photos, I decided this is exactly where I wanted to go.

Sarande

Sarande is a popular seaside town on the Albanian Riviera and is a great base for exploring other nearby destinations. Although it is a great starting base, I’m going to be honest and say it was a little disappointing. The town itself is lined with several hotels, bars, and restaurants, but it lacked the authentic appeal I had hoped for and seamed a bit commercialized. There were many fast food restaurants and bars, but not too many options when it came to sit-down restaurants. Furthermore, the food was mediocre at best, as I will touch on below. That being said, Sarande flaunted some attractive views over the waterfront during sunset and deserves a short visit.

 

Sarande Waterfront, Albania

Ksamil Islands

Ksamil village is a group of 3 islands which lie about 15 km south of Sarande and are very popular (translate: overcrowded) amongst locals during the summer. However, it is easy to see why as it boasts some of the most deep bluish green waters I have ever seen. Ksamil beach is lined with fluffy white sand starkly contrasted with the turquoise water in the backdrop, reminiscent of the Caribbean. For a quick moment, I forgot where I was. Who knew that Albania had some of the most BEAUTIFUL beaches I had ever seen? Consider mind blown. 

Ksamil islands, Albania

The main beach in Ksamil is very pretty, and super crowded. Meaning, if you don’t get there early, there will be no more sun chairs available. The good news? You can travel by small boat to the small nearby islands for a different scene. For a mere 500 LEK roundtrip ($4) you can hop on a small motor boat and get dropped off at the island of your choice. You must arrange with the driver on a pick up time to take you back.

The colours of Ksamil

The colours of Ksamil #nofilter

We spent most of our time lounging around one of the smaller islands, although I don’t know the name of it unfortunately (we just pointed and said “take us there”). The island was mostly rocky, and it wasn’t the ideal place to sunbathe. However, the water was so warm and calming that we spent most our time there swimming and playing around in the sea. There are no bathrooms or food on this island, so keep that in mind. There was a man and his daughter going around selling fresh fruit in case you fancied a snack.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE: Proizd Island: the Secluded Croatian Paradise You’ve Been Looking For

Syri Kalter

Syris Kalter, aka the “Blue Eye” as it is known locally, is a natural phenomenon located about 20km east of Sarande. The Blue Eye forms a blue portal-like hole and is supplied by an underwater natural spring. The depth of the Blue Eye remains a mystery, but there are documented reports of divers reaching around 50 meters in depth.

Syri Kalter, aka the "Blue Eye" in Albania

Syri Kalter, aka the “Blue Eye”

The water at Syri Kalter is frigid, as in the coldest water I have ever felt in my life. The water hurt my legs when I tried to stand in it for just a few seconds, so I passed on this one. Surprisingly, there were several brave divers jumping into the Blue Eye and quickly exiting. Enter at your own risk! The Blue eye is something very unique and I recommend a half day trip here to see it for yourself. There is a restaurant with a great view of the lake and bathroom facilities on site.

View from the restaurant at Syri Kalter, Albania

Albania is one of the Cheapest European Countries You Will Ever Visit

Albania was one of the cheapest, if not the cheapest, country I have ever visited. The food was cheap, the busses and taxis were cheap, and the clothes were cheap. I paid 650 LEK (a little over $5) for seafood risotto in the touristy port of Sarande, so this was even on the expensive side. A fancy margarita on the promenade cost 400 LEK (about $3.25). In Duress, it was even cheaper. For a fancy dinner with an appetizer, fresh fish, and a few glasses of wine, it cost about 1000LEK ($8).

Great for Extended Stay

Since it is so cheap, Albania is great for backpackers or even digital nomads who want to set up shop somewhere for a few weeks/months. If you’re looking to cut back on spending for a bit, or if you need to escape the Schengen for visa reasons (Albania is not part of the EU or the Schengen zone), Albania is the place to go.

It’s Not Too Touristy

I don’t personally know even one person from back home who has been to Albania. In fact, almost everyone I told I was visiting Albania responded with either “Why would you want to go to Albania?”, or “Where is Albania?”. Except for the local Balkan people in Ksamil beach and Sarande, Albania was almost completely void of tourists. I didn’t encounter ONE English speaking tourist my whole time in Albania. It has yet to be corrupted by mass tourism, and I don’t see that happening in the near future either. Translation: if you’re thinking about visiting, now is the perfect time to go.

 

The Bad

Public Transportation

The public transportation in Albania is TERRIBLE. I am going to say that Albania hands-down has the worst public transportation system I have ever experienced in my life. Actually there is no “system”. Yes there are busses, and frugons (think mini vans) that take you places, but don’t expect there to be any order or structure to anything.

There are no timetables, there is no air conditioning, and there are no marked bus stops. The only way we were able to take busses was by asking locals. We went into shops and asked anyone we could when the next bus was coming and where to wait for it. Sometimes the next one wasn’t coming for an hour and we would have to wait on the side of the road for that long because we didn’t want to miss the next one.

And when you do finally get on a bus, expect to be piled in there like sardines, with no elbow room whatsoever. There is no structure, order, or organization to Albanian public transportation. Period. This was made perfectly clear to me when I went into a bus agency in Durres and asked for a timetable, to which I was told “We don’t have, this is not your country”.  Wow, ok. I get the point. Sorry for asking, dude.

Power Outages are More Common than You Think

Several times during my trip to Albania, the power went out in restaurants and in the apartment. Sometimes it would last a few seconds, and sometimes for several minutes. No one seemed to make a big deal about it, leading me to believe this was quite common in Albania.

Expect to See Some Trash

If dirty streets bother you, you probably won’t want to go to Albania. I was surprised to see the abundance of trash lining the streets, even in the more developed areas. There was literally trash everywhere. Albania is not very developed yet, so don’t let this alarm you. This is where Albania really reminded me of Egypt the most.

Language Barrier

Out of every country I have ever visited, I can say that Albania was the hardest to find anyone who actually spoke English. I am in Albania, I get it, you don’t need to speak my language in your country. I am not that ignorant or demanding to expect that, and that’s perfectly understandable. But as a visitor, it made it extremely difficult to communicate anything we needed. Your best bet? Look for a young local, as they are more likely to speak English.

The Food

I hate to say this, but I was a bit disappointed with the food in Albania. I thought with such close proximity to culinary havens such as Italy, Croatia, and Greece that the food would be outstanding. I put it under the “bad” category mainly because the food was so unpredictable. The food in Sarande completely disappointed me. I had some salty risotto, some bland risotto, and the worst gelato I have ever tasted. I took a bite and threw it away, it was that bad.

In Durres, however, I had some amazing gelato and some authentic Albanian stuffed peppers that were out of this world tasty. In Ksamil, I had some of the best grilled sea bass I had ever tasted. That being said, I never knew what I was going to get. I could get one of the best meals of my life, or the worst. C’mon Albania, get it together.

The Ugly

Ok, here is where shit really gets real. Sorry, but there is about to be some cursing going on in the next few minutes, you have been forewarned. With travel comes adventure, and sometimes you are faced with unpredictable moments. But that’s part of the thrill that’s so alluring, don’t you think? Everything about Albania seemed a bit crazy to me. However, there were 2 times where I actually said WTF. Here’s why…

Story 1: Crazyness.

When leaving Durres to catch my 7am bus to Montenegro (which actually ended up being 7:30am because the local told me differently. But hey, I didn’t actually expect the bus schedule to be accurate anyway with my experience), it was pouring down rain as I entered a taxi with an older driver. As we approached the bus station (they actually have one in Durres surprisingly), the bus driver was standing outside and my taxi driver accidentally side-swiped his body and broke off his mirror. The bus driver forcefully fell and skid in the rain. Holy shit, did he just hit him? Next thing I know, the bus driver gets up, dusts himself off, and approaches the taxi. He opened the passenger door, started screaming intensely in Albanian at the old man, and then got inside and started PUNCHING the driver uncontrollably. The old man fought back and things were getting heated up front. Meanwhile, I’m in the back horrified and shocked and just want to get the hell out of there, but I don’t. I sit there and watch the show. Not because I wanted to, but because my luggage was in the trunk and I was afraid the taxi driver would drive away with my stuff, just to get rid of the bus driver. My heart was pounding, my palms were sweating, and the whole car was shaking as they were throwing fists and yelling. Some elbows were actually coming into the back seat as my eyes widened in horror. Fuck, get me out of here! Finally, another man came from outside and grabbed the bus driver and pulled him out of the car and the fight stopped. I grabbed my luggage and got onto the bus as quickly as possible. You know what was really awkward? That same angry bus driver punching the poor old man taxi driver was now driving my bus to Montenegro. Please don’t have road rage, please don’t have road rage, please don’t have road rage. Thankfully, I got to Montenegro safe and without incident. The funny thing was that when I got off the bus, I saw that the bus driver had a huge welt on his eye and it was almost completely swollen shut. Oh what a lovely experience.

Story 2: Unexpected adventure that could have turned out bad. Do NOT try this at home kids.

So we decided to take the bus to Syri Kalter one afternoon. After wasting time finding a bus that actually would take us there from Sarande, we were on our way. The bus dropped us off in the middle of nowhere in front of a dirt road, to which the driver pointed. Ok, I guess this is where we go? We saw signs saying Syri Kalter 2km. To make a long story short, when it came time to leave, there were no busses going back. Shocker. We walked along the road in the sweltering heat as the daylight began to fade. Oh crap, we don’t want to be left here in the middle of nowhere, especially when it gets dark. We started walking back to where the bus dropped us off, hoping another one would magically appear in the distance. But literally, we were in the middle of the forest, with nothing around. As the sun began to set, we had to make a choice. We looked at each other, and said, fuck it we have no choice. So, hitchhiking it is! Neither of us had ever done it before, and it always seems to end up bad in movies. Don’t be the stupid blonde that gets into to car, don’t do it! But hey, desperate times call for desperate measures. So, nervously and hesitantly, up went our fingers. What are we doing? Fuck. A few cars passed with no response. Crap, this is going to be harder than we thought. C’mon, we are 2 innocent stranded girls who just want to get back home. We were getting a bit concerned as we entertained the fact that we might end up sleeping in the forest. Nooooo, that can’t happen. Someone will stop, right? After some anticipation, we finally had a car drive by with loud music, and they slammed on the brakes. Yes! It was a bunch of local young Albanians who spoke some English and who were on their way North to Tirana. But Sarande is 30 minutes out of the way. Crap. After explaining our situation and after offering cash to take us there, they persistently refused, saying they would take us for free! What? That’s awesome. There are still some good people in this world. We had a good feeling about them, so we got in and were on our way, listening to Albanian music and learning some new Albanian words (bad words of course). They got a kick out of us repeating them aloud. We got really lucky that we safely made it back to Sarande. It could have been way worse. I would like to note that I do not endorse hitchhiking, but like I said before, sometimes desperate times call for desperate measures. Lesson learned.

Other Unusual/Random Things I Noticed in Albania

  • Any time we told someone we were from America, they seemed shocked and asked, “Why would you come to Albania? They couldn’t seem to understand. Literally, everyone had that same reaction.
  • There is no concept of personal space. When you go into a store, everyone runs in and races to  the counter to be served. To make sure that no one can get in front of them, they make sure there is no space between them and the person in front of them. I witnessed this several times and once this young man had to turn around and basically tell the man hovering over him to back off.
  • People will stop their car in the middle of the street and run into a nearby store. This happened on a main road while we were riding a bus. We had to wait about 4-5 minutes and the bus driver had to actually get out and track the man down. Some unpleasant words were exchanged and we were on our way.

 

TIPS

  • Not one place in Albania accepted credit cards. They aren’t that advanced yet, so expect to pay in cash and leave the plastic at home.
  • Pay in LEK only, not Euros. Locals will try to rip tourists off by charging them in Euro, but the exchange rate is much better when using LEK. They will be adamant about it, but tell them you live there and you only have LEK. They will accept it! Trust me.
  • Don’t rely on public transportation if you need to be any place at a specific time, such as for catching a flight or ferry. Take a taxi instead, they are not that expensive. You can also bargain with them before you accept the ride. Or if you dare, rent a car to see more of the landscape in a short amount of time and to bypass the stress of public transport.
  • Try to find accommodation on airbnb.com. It’s extremely cheap and you can get your own apartment for similar prices as a hotel. For 3 nights, my friend and I stayed a few minute walk to the center and paid $57 each, including all the taxes and fees. Use my coupon code for $20 off your first booking with airbnb.
  • You can buy a local SIM for data at Vodafone for $6-10 depending on how many GBs you need. This definitely came  in handy when I needed to use my maps for navigation.

Would I Ever Go Back to Albania?

ABSOLUTELY. Although this article might sound more negative than positive, Albania was charming in its own way. It was weird, wacky, unconventional, surprising, and quirky. But that is also what was so appealing about it. I was constantly on the edge of my seat, not knowing what to expect next, and that’s exactly the spontaneity I love about traveling. Albania is beautiful, non-touristy, the people are helpful and nice, and its extremely cheap. Despite the crazy adventures I experienced, I actually felt safe the whole time. Although the taxi encounter scared me a bit, they weren’t trying to harm me in any way, and I knew that. Overall, I felt safe in Albania, even walking around the streets at night. I realized there is so much more to explore and I have just cracked the surface of Albania’s weirdness. Until next time Albania. Stay Different.

 

MY TOP 5 RECOMMENDED TRAVEL GEAR

THAT I TAKE ON ALL MY TRAVELS:

1.Sony Alpha 6000 Mirrorless Camera: I made the switch from my huge DSLR and I wouldn’t go back. It’s light, compact, and takes amazing photos!

2. Sony 10-18mm Wide Angle Zoom Lens: this wide angle lens is the key to landscape shots. I use this lens more than the original and am super happy with it. It’s not cheap, but super worth it if you want to get those special nature shots. Honestly, I would purchase the Sony alpha 6000 camera body only and save up for this lens to go with it.

3. E Bags Packing Cubes: the biggest life changer to keep me packing light! This is my biggest travel gear obsession and I have NO idea how I traveled without them before.

4. LifeProof NUUD Waterproof Case (iPhone 6): this helps protect my phone from water, sand, dirt, and the numerous drops that incur while I travel. I love it!

5. GoPro Hero 4 Session: I am a proud GoPro ambassador and obsessed with GoPro selfie pics if you didn’t notice! (I have recently upgrade to the Hero 5, but this is the one I used in all my 2016 photos). It’s super small, compact, and easy to travel with. Plus it’s so much fun to use! πŸ™‚

Disclaimer: this post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a super small commission if you make a purchase using these links, at no extra cost to you. I only recommend products that I have used before on my own and that I truly love πŸ™‚

Have you had similar experiences traveling in Albania, good or bad? I want to hear your thoughts!

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103 Comments

  1. You really nailed the Albanian experience. I spent a week in Tirana this summer. I was asked several times, “What are you doing here?” My kids and I took the bus from Tirana to Durres and then a weird mini-van back to Tirana – totally chaotic, hot and weird – yet it all turned out great and we had an amazing meal on a restaurant built on a pier out into the water. The infrastructure seemed on the verge of collapse, the river smelled like sewage and there was trash everywhere. On the plus side, everything was cheap, the people could not have been nicer, the food in Tirana is above average. The bunker museum outside of Tirana is a trip. I would love to go back and tour the Albanian riviera.

    Reply
    • I actually went last year again (a few years after my first visit) and the conditions had definitely improved. Although it was still chaotic haha. The riviera is amazing! I would recommend Dherme and Gjipe beach if you go back next time). Its such a beautiful area!

      Reply
  2. I certainly agree with the food. My neighbour is Albanian and he makes traditional food whenever I go over and it nothing short of shocking both visually and by taste!!!……………….. and he was a chef.
    Albanian food is not good and you really do need cast iron guts to get used to it.

    Reply
  3. Thanks for writing this! I see that you’re getting a lot of flack, but I just read it as an honest interpretation of your time there. I recently met someone who spent a lot of time in Albania and he gave it glowing reviews. I’ve been doing some research and am definitely intrigued. However, after reading this post and a couple others, I’ve decided it’s probably not the trip for me. It seems like a beautiful and diverse country, but perhaps a bit too far outside of my comfort zone. I’ve truly enjoyed learning about it though! Luckily there are plenty of other countries to see…

    Reply
    • Thank you for saying that! Originally the comments were all positive and then one negative comment and everyone jumps on the bandwagon haha. That being said, I recently revisited and a lot has changed in the 3 years in between. There has been a lot more progression in terms of tourism infrastructure and the trash problem. I definitely would tell you to still visit, even it if makes you uncomfortable thinking about it! Getting out of your comfort zone is one of the best parts about travel because you learn so much about the world! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  4. Albania has so many problems. But the biggest problem is politicians are thieves, all of them, this is tragic, and connected to organised crimes, at the moment there is no hope here, it may take up to 1000 years for Albania to become Good or Great.
    Please do not come here, go to other Countries, i feel very bad when i see Tourists visiting my Primitive Country, I wonder why would some one come here????

    Reply
    • Actually I just got back from Albania on my second visit. It has changed a lot in the almost 3 years since I’ve been there before. There is less trash and they are building a lot of the areas up. I wouldn’t discourage people from coming to your country. Tourism is much needed! There is corruption in every country, even my own (especially with the new orange man ignorant people elected as our leader). But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t go to experience it yourself. I feel like Albania is on the rise! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  5. Wow your review is weird nonsense in every aspect and you still loving to go” back ” 0 I’m wondering if you really been there or you just got some pictures from Internet.

    Reply
    • What is weird nonsense? These were my observations from the time that I spent there. Everyone experiences a place differently. And yes, I’m going back next month as my best friend lives there. And ummm, i’m in lots of the photos, so what you said is nonsense. Not sure why you’re hating, but negativity is not appreciated here. Thank you!

      Reply
      • Ummm…. “….negativity not appreciated here…”??? That’s strange. I thought I just read your post negatively disparaging anyone who voted for the President of the United States? I thought you said they were “…ignorant…”? I thought you just made childish remarks about skin color? What’s the deal? These are all very “ignorant” things you should be above.

        You’d be well advised to keep your politics out of your travel blog. It’s not conducive to the gushy, feel-good image you try to promote.

        Reply
        • Who are you to tell me what I should and shouldn’t discuss on my blog? This is MY blog last time I checked. Second off, I have never once said anything about someone’s skin color, nor would I ever. WTF are you talking about? I come from mixed parents myself. You’re obviously trying to pick a fight. And for the record, i nevvvvver talk about politics except maybe once or twice. But i do think people who voted for our “leader” made a shitty/ignorant decision and I stand by that fully. If you don’t like what I say, feel free to scroll along. Have a great day.

          Reply
  6. You definitely didnt eat in the best places i asure you! If you go in fancy restaurant can be bad, but if you know those small hided places my mom know you’ll experience the best typical food ever. Really! I can tell you the reason of not many places to eat Albanian food…its was not usual to go out and eat at the restaurant,except for a Pizza. Albanians live to eat at home the typical food. Its rare nor impossible to find an albanian food restaurant anywhere in the world i tell you. I am Albanian and i always have to wait every summer to eat good food my mom cooks and thats frustrating for me ! Anyway in Albania will always get every year better but with small steps cause the government like all the others nowadays thinks only how to steal money giving nothing much back. The point is that when things will be close to those is other countries prices will rise a lot… Anyway i can recomend you few nice places to eat if you visit again saranda or Vlore. And other wonderful cities that deserve a ride.

    Regarding languages believe me last year i was in Saranda i felt like in some other country because i couldnt hear any Albanian going around. All tourisr from everywhere. Quite a lot of Albanians know english but not the old ones. Everyone almost know italian tho and some greek in the south. I dont remember about credit card payments but there is nothing better than payin in local currency thats true:)
    Hope next time you go you will write again and hope to see a nice article maybe with some moro good stuff

    Reply
    • Hi! I would love recommendations on where to eat. I am actually going back to visit this summer as my best friends lives there. I actually told her i want to visit Vlore, it looks gorgeous! If you have any recommendations, please let me know! I’m so curious to see how much things have changed since I last went πŸ™‚

      Reply
      • Hello
        I found your mail in my mailbox. I do not remember ever contacting you, however, I am planning to visit Albania and stay there for a week or even longer. Most likely, I shall be driving. I am a strict NON SMOKER. I would really like to stay with an Albanian Family to get to know Albania. I would like to meet Albanian people and be away from Tourists, especially Americans, Germans and Scandinavians. It shall be my first trip to explore the possibilities of living there permanently. Best regards
        Dr Sal Zaidi

        Reply
        • Hi!
          The only way you would have my email is if you signed up for my newsletter on my site! If you would like to stay with a family, you should rent a room in an Airbnb. While i have only been once, I dont not know all the non-touristy places yet. I think the Albanian riviera is always busy during the summer months so maybe go in May or September.

          Reply
      • You should do more research when you travel to a different country. Your review tells me that you don’t know much about the world. But than Americans think that there is no world outside of the US. People in the Usa live in a box and they are quite ignorant of other cultures. I see a lot of US turist in Australia and no one wants to deal with them. They have no clue. Just a simmple example. In AUS we make great Coffee, different styles that taste great. Americans though would only order “long black with a dash of cold milk”….they hate all the beautiful lattes or cappuccinos or whatever. They are so ignorant when it comes to tasting smth different that is actually a lot better than their black coffee with water and milk.

        About Albania
        I think i proved my point with american tourist. They have no clue once they step out of their little box. Albania just like any country in the world is not perfect. But you can have a great time, eat the fresh Mediterranean food. Sorry American tourist but Mc Donalds is not food!
        There are buses that take you everywhere, every hour.

        I am in Bali at the moment, i can say a million bad things about Bali but also there are some nice resorts away from the “bad”.

        .

        Reply
        • You can’t generalize and say all Americans are like this. THAT is ignorance on your part. And a little racism against Americans I’m hearing. I have traveled to 77 countries and have been traveling the last 4 years, I think I know a little thing or 2 about the world.

          While you might have observed some Americans to be like you described, I am NOT one of them. “Americans hate all the beautiful lattes or cappuccinos or whatever”..sorry but that’s just stupid to say and a complete hasty generalization. I don’t know what the hell you have against Americans, but please don’t project these racist views on my page. I am American and that’s offensive. And I don’t eat McDonald’s shit food thank you very much. That is not food to me.

          The observations about Albania are from my point of view. There is no bus schedule in DurrΓ«s and the South where I was. I was even told this at the “bus station” in DurrΓ«s bu the local who worked there. He said, “this is not your country, we do not have bus schedule”.

          Again, not sure what your problem is, but please take your generalizations and racist remarks elsewhere. Have a great day! Buh-bye.

          Reply
  7. I don’t have to go to Albania, my neighbours are from there and refuse to go back; as nice as they are I can honestly say Albanian food is absolutley disgusting! Its very basic and very much an acquired taste……all of it!

    Reply
    • The fresh seafood was actually really good πŸ™‚

      Reply
    • They are definitely stupid people cause no one can spit in the plate where they ate. Albania is not perfect but is my country i will always love it in good and bad. You dont have to go anywhere but traveling opens the mind and makes us internally richer than what we think we are. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  8. I’m in Albania at the moment. Beautiful environment but being totally ruined by the fly-tipping and rubbish EVERYWHERE. I understand that Albania is a poor country with limited infrastructure but can someone please explain why the rubbish dumping is considered acceptable by Albanians.

    Reply
  9. Hey,

    I loved your article. I am Albanian and I always like to know what people think of my weird country, but almost no body will tell to your face what they don’t like, so I really enjoyed reading this honest piece.

    Saranda is where most tourists go when they travel to Albania, but they really shouldn’t. It is over developed and not in a good way. It is such a pity because Saranda used to be gorgeous, but you know, 20 years of wild and unplanned development… I would only recommend going for Butrint. A couple of years ago I would have recommended it for the Blue Eye too, but last year I went to the Blue Eye and it was crazy overcrowded so I would not bring someone there, especially in August. Anyways, I am sorry that you couldn’t find the delicious restaurants in Saranda, for there are some very good ones (I am kind of a foodie myself so food is very important when I travel).

    Anyways, if you ever travel to Albania again, do it in the beginning of Summer or end of Spring, and try to go to the north too. You know, we are surrounded by gorgeous countries, like Greece , Italy, Montenegro, Croatia, and we are far from them, especially when it comes to tourism infrastructure, but I believe there is one thing that Albania has and these other countries do not: It is a very small country where you can find almost every thing there is to find in nature (except for volcanoes) so the scenery changes dramatically. You take a turn and go from the canyons to the sea, from an alpine scenery to a Mediterranean one. I love that when I travel around Albania!

    Cheers!

    Reply
    • Hi Eni!
      Thank you for the positive feedback! I always love to hear from Albanians regarding my post. A few have gotten offended, but most of them are genuinely curious to know what others have to say about their country.

      I do plan on coming back to Albania at the end of spring next year. My best friend lives there (for the past 2 years) and she told me of some more of the more local spots and some gorgeous places along the coast like Vlore, etc. I cannot wait to return actually. I’m wondering if it will have changed in the span of 2-3 years. I’m also excited to try some more of the food, as my friend seems to have found some really good places. If you have any recommendations for food, please let me know! She lives in Durres. I also would really love to see more of the nature of Albania as I love hiking and being outside. My friend is actually in Velbona right now enjoying herself. It looks so prettttty!!!

      Reply
    • Hello Albanians
      I have been planning a trip to Albania. I shall drive. I would like to stay there for quite a while. My aim is to learn the language and if all goes well, to live there. I am a retired government servant. Please advise me and help me to make it a viable proposition. Thanks. My email: saldoczaidi@gmail.com
      Best wishes and regards
      Sal

      Reply
  10. It is all true, I am an albanian who travels a lot and I totally understand your point of view. Albania is a poor country , also underdeveloped and a mixture of cultures. Don’t mind the nay sayers. We have a big national ego but mostly comes from ex communist era. The young generation is Albanian’s hope. I As for public transportation is crap even in capital Tirana you have to wait 1 hour for a bus. That’s another reason why most of the young albanians want to immigrate including myself.

    Reply
    • Hi Bruno,
      Thanks for the comment. The public transport is probably the area that needs the most improvement. Hopefully it can be improved in the future because I have a feeling tourism is going to increase there once everyone finds out about all the beautiful places to see. I still love the country and will be back next spring to see more of it. My best friend lives there and will show me around to other spots I didn’t experience before. I’m wondering if anything will have changed when I return. We shall see. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  11. Ironic that what you considered the bad and ugly (food, non-English, etc) are exactly what others love about Albania (pretty much anyone under 40 speaks English and Italian, food is AMAZING and cheap). I guess we all have experiences but next time I suggest spend some time and google transportation options as there are many cheap, nice options. Glad you enjoyed it overall.

    Reply
    • Hi Iris,
      If you read carefully, I only said I didn’t like the food in Saranda. I loved the food in Durress! Either way, it’s just an opinion as taste buds are very subjective :). Hardly anyone I interacted with spoke English, I’m not lying about that one. Oh, and of course I researched the transportation options on google. My best friend actually lives there and the transport is not easy even for her. She complains about how much of a disaster it is. I stand by my word in that the public transport is very unorganized and terrible. When I was told there were no bus timetables at the station, that made it very clear haha. But yes, overall, I LOVED Albania, despite all that. It’s definitely a country with a lot of character and beauty and I will definitely return! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  12. How about a black sista goes there? Will she be accepted? or do they only like white people? You forgot to mention Albania is the most racist and hateful country in Europe if you are not white. But they call it nationalism and patriotism.

    Reply
    • I’m sorry to hear that Breyana. I haven’t heard that so I cannot comment on that. I have friends of many different races (not white) who visited and never had any problems.

      Reply
    • Hi Breyana,
      What experience do you or your non-white friends have in Albania? Curious and concerned. My family is Albanian and Albania is one of the few countries in Europe where people from different ethnic backgrounds and religions are accepted. I’ve had black soldier friends visit and they have loved it. Hopefully you have a good experience.

      Reply
    • I have in Albania this summer and I am stunned by the somehow negative article. I loved the food everywhere, people spoke English, nature is breathtaking, amazing ancient history and so on. Albania is a must visit and if so try to get in touch with a local Tour Operator we used for 15 days.
      FYI http://www.apollon-tours.com

      Reply
  13. Very interesting.
    As a born and raised in Albania there are things you should have known since you decided to go there and could have lead in a different conclusion and enjoyed more, 9 /10 time I pay with card when out and about while visiting there, prox once a year but we can’t exclude a lot of unusual thing that happen there.
    I think we have had plenty of travellers opinions which has reflected negative views and it doesn’t surprise us.
    If I would decide to go to visit Detroit without searching where I want to go and what I want to do perhaps I would end up in some place where is no go area and get shot yet again it has the reputation of great place to be visited so my point here is that we need a bit of positive feedback rather then concentrate more on negative a specially for a Country that has been priped a part in every aspect that you can think of from 1400 to 1990.

    Reply
    • Hi Tonin,

      I’ve been getting a lot of comments lately from Albanians criticizing that I focused on the negatives of their country. Am I only supposed to write about the positives? That’s not reality. I like to keep it real and give an account exactly how I saw it. There were good and bad parts of the country…just as there are in the US. I was simply giving my observations based on my experience.

      On another note, my best friend lives there and she gave me a small heads-up of what to expect and how it might not be what I’m used to. I knew beforehand and wanted to experience it myself!

      And I DID enjoy Albania…I’m not sure why people keep making a comment about that…If you read the entirety, I emphasized that I loved the madness and I definitely will return! It’s a beautiful country and the fact that its not overcrowded with tourism is very appealing!!

      Oh and btw, using Detroit in your example was probably not the best. Detroit is rated in the top 10 of most dangerous cities in the US. I don’t think tourists to the US are going to be traveling there out of all the places in America haha.

      Anyway, hope you were not offended in any way, I just recounted my personal experience. Cheers!

      Reply
  14. You visit a country without google it first?
    First there is no direct line from Saranda to Syri Kalter. (you are a so cheap to have a taxi bring you there? There are also guides that can bring you with their cars, search google m8)

    Public transportation: Every city has a bus terminal. They connect all cities together. For example, buses that take you to Tirana, have a frequency of 1 per hour.

    Food: Where the hell can you find better, healthy, great food? You pay 15 euro for a great meal. God!

    Incident: I have seen worse in other countries.

    This post of your is very wrong in many directions. If you want to show the negative sides of Albania, you found the wrong descriptions. There are many problems in Albania, but none of what you wrote!
    Cheers
    From a Guide who has been working for 10 years in Albania.

    Reply
    • Hi Tony,

      Thanks for the comment. It’s ok to disagree. I have gotten a few hate comments on this post…but for the most part, most everyone (locals and visitors) agree on everything I wrote. I wasn’t trying to bring out the negative sides of Albania…I was just giving an account from my point of view based on MY experiences. This is what I saw and what I experienced during my time there, thats all. That’s what blogs are for…to share your experiences.

      Are you trying to tell me there isn’t overflowing trash on the streets, the power doesn’t go out frequently, and the bus system is efficient? I am not wrong on these points, you know this if you live there. My best friend has lived there for almost 2 years now and she even tells me worse things.

      The food thing is a total opinion of mine..not everyone likes the same foods, geez. And if you read the article closely, I said the bad food was mostly in Sarande..Tirana had excellent food!

      YES I know how to use google, no need to act like I’m an idiot. That’s not nice.

      NO, we were not too cheap for a taxi, but why take a taxi when you can take a bus for 80% less? It’s called smart traveling. Contrary to what you said, there actually IS a bus line from Sarande to Syri Kaltar because we took it! It drops you off down the road from it, like 10 minute walk. We just didn’t know the times they were returning since there isnt a “regular” schedule (we asked the bus driver and he said he didn’t know when the busses were returning).

      Also, there is no “bus schedule” as the guy working in the main bus station in Tirana told me when I asked him. He said, “this isn’t your country, we don’t have schedule”. So that proved it to me clearly haha. I’ve traveled all around the world and ALbania was the hardest to use public transport due to lack of schedules and actual bus stations throughout the city (mainly Sarande). We had to ask locals where to stand to catch the busses or furgons.

      If you’ve lived in Albania for 10 years, you’re probably used to all this. But you gotta understand how this is for a visitor who only spends a short amount of time there. Everyone has a different point of view and we shouldn’t fault them for that.

      Either way, I also wrote about all the things I loved about Albania, so don’t only focus on the negatives. It’s a quirky country and I actually liked the madness. It kept me on my feet and I will return one day!

      Reply
  15. Albanian road rage at its finest! Man, I am not sure how I would have reacted to that situation, either. Otherwise, Albania does sound ridiculously cheap! Now you mentioned AirBnB as a way to cut down your accommodation costs. But, how did you find the hostel situation in Albania? Similar to its undeveloped public transportation? Or is it pretty similar to hostels in Greece, Croatia, and Italy?

    Reply
    • Hi Ray!
      I’ve actually never stayed in a hostel. I usually go with Airbnb or hotels. I like my privacy :). So I’m not sure about that one! But the Airbnbs were way cheaper than Croatia, Italy, or Greece!

      Reply
  16. Great article! You are so spot on with everything! LOL I am Albanian but live in the DC area. Albania is a beautiful country that’s why I go back every summer. The Albanians are very nice people. I was not surprised that you found a ride back and that they did not take the money you offered to pay. Great blog!

    Reply
    • Aww great to hear that from an Albanian! Yes, they were very nice!! It was a crazy experience for sure, but I cant wait to go back!! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  17. Hello,
    This was a very interesting and entertaining blog post. You certainly had a wonderful adventure. I am an American volunteer living in Puke, Albania and trying to encourage tourists to a visit our part of Northern Albania. I am working with an agricultural NGO with interests in agro-tourism and medicinal herbs. I would love to correspond with anyone who has been to Albania to ask about certain ways that we could do better, and also to anyone who is thinking of visiting here. Please feel free to write me!
    Mary Lou

    Reply
    • Hello Mary Lou, thanks so much for the comment. I’m emailing you right now πŸ™‚

      Reply
  18. I actually told my boyfriend yesterday that Albania is one of the next countries I want to visit in Europe and he just looked confused. I’ve actually been to Skhoder, Albania–for about 3 hours–and have wanted to go back to visit the beaches ever since. I love the idea of visiting a place that is visited by so few tourists (though the beaches look a bit more crowded than I was expecting…).

    Reply
    • Ya that seems to be the common reaction when telling others you want to go to Albania haha. But its probably because people don’t really know too much about it. Once they go, hopefully it opens their eyes and they enjoy their experience! It really is a different country and I would encourage everyone to go at least once!

      Reply
    • Albania is definitely a great place to visit and the Albanian Riviera is getting popular among European tourists:)

      Reply
      • Its still not busy like other European seaside countries! But I know what you mean :). I cant wait to go back!

        Reply
  19. I really liked this guide. Thanks for being honest about both the good and the bad! Perhaps if more people visited Albania, they would be more inclined to improve some of those not-so-great parts?

    Reply
    • Thank you! Yes, perhaps. But the rugged-ness really has an appeal to it. It’s one of the few places in Europe not ambushed with mass tourism and that’s what really makes me love it! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  20. I’ve been there to and as much the post seems to be quite accurate, I think you exaggerated the whole syri kalter thing. πŸ™‚ I did the same, hitchhiked back, all save and sound.

    Reply
    • I didn’t exaggerate anything. We got back completely safe and sound as well, just was an exciting adventure! Maybe if you’ve hitch hiked before it wouldn’t be such a big deal, but hitch hiking is a big deal to me and that was my very first time! I guess it’s just different experiences and backgrounds. Albania is one wacky place, and I’m glad more people are going to see for themselves!:)

      Reply
  21. I hear many mixed reviews about Albania and everything you mentioned about the public transportation (bad) and beaches (wonderful) were what other bloggers have mentioned. I’m glad that despite the having to hitchhike and being involved with an incident between the bus driver and taxi driver that you are safe and would visit Albania again. It’s always good to hear a traveler’s honest opinion and advice.

    Reply
    • Thanks! Yes, I would definitely go back and I will! I would encourage others to go as well, it’s the most off-the-beaten path country in Europe for me! Everything together made it unforgettable and I hope it doesn’t scare anyone off from visiting! It has its faults, but it is a beautiful country! And if people decide not to go, then its less touristy for those who do end up going hehe πŸ™‚

      Reply
  22. I love how candid you are in your description. I grew up inbAlbania and have been in the US for a decade now. You are soooo spot on with everything you’ve listed here. I think the best way to experience Albania is through the help of a local or someone that’s been there before. I visited Albania with two friends a couple of years ago and they loved the thrill of all the craziness you describe but also had peace of mind because I spoke the language and knew how to haggle all the prices and knew the best places to take the. I wish you had seen and listed more awesome things about Albania like Butrinti, the castles that are almost in every city/town, the hikes and the lakes…oh there’s so much to see there! You must go back. Thank you for this refreshing blog post. Albania is gorgeous, cheap and crazy! It will always be a trip to remember πŸ™‚

    Reply
    • Hi Alba from Albania! πŸ™‚ Yes, I wish I would have more things on the good part of Albania, but I was only there 4 days total and these were just my observations! You’re right, there is so much more to see! I will definitely be going back and updating this post when I do! (I’m sure I’ll have more crazy stories to add as well haha). Albania is raw and I liked to show that! That’s why I loved it so much! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  23. This is what you got out of Albania? Ugh. Oh just fuck off. I can’t.
    And you didn’t like the food? Where the fuck do you come from? I sincerely hope that the borders close again, if only to keep people like you out. Why the fuck would someone share this with me? ugh. I’m going to kill Zach.

    Reply
    • Geez, why so hostile? Last time I checked, this was a blog (MY BLOG), where one is allowed to voice their honest opinions. Most people that have gone to Albania tell me this post is SPOT ON the same experiences they have had. My best friend lives there and she agrees with everything. I’m in no way bashing Albania, I actually really loved it! And if you read about what I said about the food, I said it was hit or miss. I actually had some really awesome food there! If you don’t like what I say, you are not forced to read it. Thanks for your comment and have a great day.

      Reply
  24. Good and candid post, every country and place we visit has its share of the good, the bad and the ugly. Guess that is what travel is all about.

    Reply
    • Thanks. This is very true! I had fun writing this piece πŸ™‚

      Reply
  25. Albania I have never been sure about, and when you describe it as the Egypt of Europe is makes me a little more hesitant. However your pictures look amazing and I’m sure I’ll venture over there when I’ve traveled a bit mote!

    Reply
    • YA I wouldn’t go there as your first ever solo trip or anything…but I would definitely recommend you going, when like you said, you’re a bit more traveled. It’s very exciting and you definitely will not leave without a good story πŸ™‚

      Reply
  26. this is an excellent guide to albania. you definitely achieved your goal of giving the real picture of your trip. those waters are stunning, btw!

    Reply
    • Thanks! Hope it helps. And yes, the water there was unreal! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  27. Great tips about Albania. Those beaches are stunning, great photos. Sorry to hear that you had some issues and I’m still in shock that nobody accepts credit cards. Wow. Hopefully the country will grow and clean up as it is in primo tourist location. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
    • Ya, in a weird way, I liked the rugged-ness of it. I kinda like it the way it is with no tourists too hehe πŸ™‚

      Reply
  28. I visited Albania back in 2005 and it’s interesting to read not much has changed – there are definitely more tourists around now and the beach towns have been developed quite a lot, but looks like the food and litter are still awful!

    Reply
    • Oh wow, I cant imagine how it was that long ago! Ya the little is terrible and it still seems pretty undeveloped. But I liked it…hardly any tourists! It seemed more authentic, even if it was a little dirty πŸ™‚

      Reply
  29. Albania is on our list and your post made us want to go even more. We like the challenging travel aspect of it. Creates great stories for later πŸ˜‰

    Reply
    • Haha yes you will definitely have some stories after Albania, believe me! Its unconventional to say the least. But it’s something you will never forget!

      Reply
  30. Its great to read about all aspects of Albania not just the good. Looks like its a beautiful place to visit!

    Reply
    • Ya it was definitely different haha. Just wanted to prepare those who would like to go! It is so worth it! Something you need to experience πŸ™‚

      Reply
  31. It’s funny to read something and be like “Omagosh” through most of it, even the good stuff, and then see that you’d go back. I think that just goes to show that there’s always more to say about the bad stuff and that the good stuff will also outweigh all of that bad stuff. I’d love to go and experience the craziness.

    Reply
    • Ya totally. Even when I read it back, I was hoping it wouldn’t scare people away! The coastline is out of this world and the people were overall nice. I am definitely going to go back and explore more of the undiscovered places πŸ™‚

      Reply
  32. Great insights and tips! A friend has been talking about traveling to Albania recently so I will pass him the article!

    Reply
    • Awesome, thanks! Hope this helps! ALbania is SO different, but definitely worth the adventure!

      Reply
  33. This article is fantastic. Thanks for sharing. I’m headed to Albania this summer and will certainly keep in mind some of your tips!

    Reply
    • Thanks!! And enjoy Albania, it’s so different than anywhere you will go in Europe, I guarantee! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  34. This is a great article. I love how you presented the good, bad and ugly. Other bloggers have recommended Albania too. Must put on my destination list.

    Reply
    • Thank you! I wanted to make sure you know what you’re getting into when you go! It probably wouldn’t be the best destination for your first trip abroad, because there is a lot to take in! That being said, i still definitely recommend it! There are very few places in Europe not overrun by mass tourism and Albania is a perfect example! No tourists!!! For now… :). If you need any more tips or advice on Albania, please let me know! I actually think I’m going to go back next year since my best friend now lives there!

      Reply
      • Thanks! Enjoy your next trip

        Reply
  35. It seems to be a beautiful place with problems some less than others but some that are terrible that hope are resolved some how

    Reply
    • Ya they definitely have problems as they are one of the least developed European countries, if not the least. But the good outweighed the bad and it’s definitely worth a visit! I loved it

      Reply
  36. What a crazy experience and such a fun post to read! I’m hooked on your blog now! πŸ™‚

    Reply
    • Aww thanks! Ya, Albania was one of the most crazy experiences I’ve ever had for sure. Haha. I have lots more crazy stories that i’ll share int he future as well. Thanks for reading!

      Reply
  37. Wow this was an amazing read, I do travel on my blog as well, along with fashion. I live in the US and have never been to Europe , many places there are on my bucket list! Albania looks so beautiful and I would love visit there….the beaches remind me of Hawaii, the water is so pretty!

    Awesome travel site you have!!

    Valerie

    Reply
    • Thanks for the comments! Omg we gotta get you to Europe!!! You won’t ever want to leave!!! If you need any tips or help planning, please let me know!

      Reply
  38. holy crap, that story about the bus driver. I’ve had my fair share of weird public transportation stories but I have to say that tops it. I don’t know what I would do!

    Reply
    • Haha I know, right? I couldn’t believe it was happening. I seriously froze because I didn’t know what to do. And I didn’t want to leave so he could drive away with my stuff! So i sat and enjoyed the boxing match haha

      Reply
  39. This was a fascinating read! My boyfriend visited Albania earlier this summer and also came back full of new impressions. I;ve never been but it sounds like a really interesting (if challenging) place to visit in Europe!

    Thanks a lot for joining the ‘Girls vs Globe’ linkup by the way! <3

    Reply
    • Thanks Sabina! Yes, its hard to explain the phenomenon that is Albania haha (but i tried my best). It’s really some place different than what you are used to traveling. You need to add it to your list! Can’t wait for the next linkup!:)

      Reply
  40. Wow, what a trip! Never been there, sorry to hear about your negative experiences, but the water is oh so clear – beautiful for sure!

    Reply
    • A little negative, but let me tell you the positive far outweighed the negative and I don’t think that should scare anyone away from visiting this beautiful country!! I’m actually planning my trip back for 2016…so much more to see! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  41. What a great adventure! Albania is definitely on my list. Thanks for sharing such an honest opinion about your experience.

    Reply
    • Thanks! Albania should definitely be on your list, especially if you enjoy more remote and off-the-beaten path destinations!

      Reply
  42. wow, I have never been in Albania, but I was in Montenegro or Serbia, so quite near, but I didnΒ΄t have any problems like that. But in Montenegro it was also a bit problem to talk in English with people, we prefered using our native language-Czech, they somehow “understood” it. The transport reminds me African style – in Kenya itΒ΄s like this, no official bus stops, no timetables, you just wait when some bus is passing, wave and just ask driver where is he going…my friends – locals – explained me that some buses with some strips in specific colors head to specific quaters of the city, but I never managed to recognize it and remember it… πŸ˜€ but I would like to visit Albania one day, so itΒ΄s good to read this article πŸ™‚ Thank you

    Reply
    • I’ve been to Montenegro and Serbia, and Albania is way different!! It’s more wild and unstructured than any other place I’ve been in Europe. But don’t let that scare you away,it has so much to offer and overall i had a great adventure!! Kenya sounds fun! I need to make it over there one day!

      Reply
  43. Sorry but that physical fight between taxi driver and bus guy is hilarious. Your hitchhiking reminds me of when me and the ex were in Belize and the bus dropped us in the middle of nowhere and we had to walk (pitch black/ in a jungle/forest) to the the resort. Needless to say I wasn’t down for the walk with only our phones as light…so I definitely was willing to risk it and hitchhike. His azz thought that was more dangerous than walking through the jungle to our resort. I can take on humans but I don’t stand a chance against Jaguars, etc. Spoiler: we survived the walk but I broke up with him once we returned to the states. #teamhitchhike.

    Reply
    • Wait, is this the Sakon i know? If so, how the heck are you?! Been forever and hope you’re doing well!! Haha that story fucking rocks!!! You’re a badass and better off without him!! The best stories come from travel, love it!!

      Reply
  44. Albania is marked in my diary as a country I would love to return to one day.

    I was curious about your version of the ‘good, bad and ugly’ as last year I spent some time road tripping across the Balkans with an old van. The Albania we experienced was pretty similar to the one you are describing – a hidden gem with probably the last such untouched beaches in Europe (shh, please don’t tell anyone :)), the big unknown regarding the language and culture as it was for long time totally isolated, but also pretty chaotic with a lot of thrash around. We had amazing (and cheap) seafood, met friendly people but were also sad to see the ugly hotel development projects as the tourist resorts of the future. If you are interested, here is my photo diary from that part of our Balkan trip.

    Reply
    • Awesome, just checked out your pics. Looks like you really got off the beaten path, love it! And I agree, let’s hope it stays unspoilt so we can go back and enjoy it without the huge crowds shhh πŸ™‚

      Reply
  45. I was traveling in the Balkans in Sept, and my friend Andre pointed me to your Instagram. I finished my trip with a few days in Albania, and yep! Crazy and awesome at the same time. I knew I’d have public transportation issues, so we ended up renting a car, which was pretty scary! It took nerves of steel to drive around, but I’m so glad I did it! I had a great time there and would definitely go back. I’ve been writing a bit on my own blog: http://www.laurenhoya.com/search/label/albania

    Reply
    • Awesome, glad you liked it! It sure is an adventurous experience. Just checked out your site, great pics! I especially liked the kitty :). I need to make it to Berat and Vlore, both look amazing!!

      Reply
  46. I travelled south east coast of Europe and these were my EXACT thoughts on Albania. Absolutely indescribable! I touched down in Tirana by bus after traveling from Montenegro and holy crap! Biggest culture shock of my life! But it was amazing. Vlore and sarande were beautiful

    Reply
    • I’m glad I’m not the only one who felt that way! Totally unexpected since I’ve traveled extensively in Europe and never in my life had I seen a place like Albania!! Gotta love it haha. I didn’t get a chance to get to Vlore, but really want to. I’m definitely going to go back so I’m going to check it out when I do! Thanks for the tip! πŸ™‚

      Reply

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